Coping with Flashbacks and Dissociation

Introduction

There are a variety of situations where a client or helpline caller may experience negative emotions and need to use coping strategies to help themselves cope. These can include flashbacks to abuse or trauma (such as in child sexual abuse or Post Traumatic Stress Disorder), dissociation, or simply intrusive thoughts or memories of a variety of painful experiences.

In these situations, there are a variety of techniques that can be taught to clients to help them stay grounded and cope. They are summarized below.

Physical Techniques for Coping with Flashbacks

Physical techniques focus on using your physical body or space to reduce your flashbacks or dissociation.

  • Plant your feet on the ground or grasp the arms of a chair
  • Repeat one’s name, age or location
  • Go to a safe space (e.g. home), a place where you feel calm and safe

Behavioural Techniques for Coping with Flashbacks

Behavioural techniques are actions that you can take when you feel stressed or overwhelmed. Ways of expressing yourself can give you a sense of control that will make it easier to cope.

  • Journal or writing
  • Verbalizing emotions
  • Calling a crisis line or mobile crisis team
  • Going to the hospital
  • Taking a walk

Cognitive Techniques for Coping with Flashbacks

Cognitive techniques are those things that involve your thoughts. These may be more challenging than the other techniques but with practice will become easier to use when you are feeling overwhelmed. Because these are hard to summarize they’ve been listed with more detail than the above techniques.

Identify Internal Cues

Internal cues are those things that prompt you to think that you are going to dissociate or experience flashbacks. Sometimes they come on randomly, but for other individuals there is a period of feeling flushed, having a racing heart, feeling anxious or restless, or other symptoms that precede the flashbacks or dissociation. When you recognize these occurring, using the other techniques on this list can help you cope.

Identify Associational Cues

Associational cues are those things that you associate with safety and security. These can be objects, sources of support like pets or other things that remind you that things will be okay. The association between the item and the positive thoughts it brings can help ground you.

Safe Space (Mind)

Going to a “safe space” mentally and remembering that what you are experiencing is temporary can be helpful. Guided imagery (described below) can help you find this safe space, which can also be a place in your own memory where you felt safe and protected.

Meditation and Guided Imagery

Meditation is a very common strategy for coping with flashbacks and dissociation. Meditation takes practice, but by using slow and steady breathing and trying to clear your thoughts when you are not in a state of dissociation or flashbacks, you will build this skill up to where you can implement it when you sense you are going to dissociate.

Guided imagery is similar, but rather than meditating or focusing on your own breathing, you focus on a guided story that will help keep you grounded.

Label Emotions

Labeling your emotions can be a very effective way of reducing immediate stress. This can be both to yourself (merely talking out loud), or to a support like a friend, a pet or a crisis line. Many people who experience trauma have difficulty labeling their emotions and this exercise (especially when practiced as part of comprehensive therapy) can help keep you grounded.

Cognitive Restructuring

Cognitive restructuring refers to techniques of identifying and challenging automatic or maladaptive thoughts. The simplest way to do this is with an ABC (Action, Behaviour, Cognition) worksheet. An ABC worksheet lists actions that made you feel bad, behaviours or results from that, and the cognitions that went along with that.

For instance,

  • Action: A girl didn’t smile at me when I smiled at her
  • Behaviour: I felt bad
  • Cognition: I’m not attractive

This is an example of a common ABC scenario. The goal is to identify other possible cognitions so that you can “rewrite the script.” An example of a different script:

  • Action: A girl didn’t smile at me when I smiled at her
  • Behaviour: I realized she probably didn’t see me
  • Cognition: Nobody has judged my attractiveness yet

This process is best accomplished with a therapist, but can be done in a self-help format. The book Mind Over Mood utilizes many of these techniques.

General Self Care for Coping with Flashbacks

  • HALT – Hungry, Angry, Lonely, Tired. These are the 4 states that make it harder to regulate your emotions and increase your impulsiveness.
  • Eating Healthy
  • Exercising
  • Medical Evaluation

5-4-3-2-1 Coping with Flashbacks

This technique is a very popular technique for coping that focuses on what you identify as real and also serves as a form of meditation.

  1. In 5-4-3-2-1 coping, you begin by thinking about five things that you can see around you. Listing them off out loud can help you with this exercise. Study them and describe them to yourself. Performing deep breathing (a slow inhale over 5 seconds, holding for 5 seconds, and exhaling over 5 seconds) can help with this as well.
  2. Next, describe 4 things that you can feel, such as your heart beating, your feet on the floor or your back in your chair.
  3. Next, 3 things that you can hear, like a television in another room, traffic outside or birds singing.
  4. After that, 2 things that you can smell – or two smells that make you happy, like fresh baked cookies.
  5. Finally, end with one thing you can taste. Your saliva, gum, or food you ate recently? Some people also substitute “One thing you like about yourself” for this exercise as well.
Cite this article as: MacDonald, D.K., (2017), "Coping with Flashbacks and Dissociation," retrieved on November 17, 2017 from http://dustinkmacdonald.com/coping-flashbacks-dissociation/.
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Using the Violence Risk Appraisal Guide (VRAG)

Introduction

The Violence Risk Appraisal Guide (VRAG; Quinsey, Harris, Rice, & Cormier, 2006) is a tool that can be used to estimate statistically the risk of recidivism. It is comprised of 12 items that are associated with a risk of re-offending and is completed with all available information. You can download the full VRAG in PDF format. The Sexual Offender Risk Appraisal Guide (SORAG) is reviewed in another article.

The VRAG is an actuarial risk assessment, involving a mathematical technique applied to determines what factors were present in offenders who later went on to commit violent crimes. (Brown & Singh, 2014) This approach eliminates the bias found in unstructured judgement.

The VRAG has been examined in over 40 studies, and has been found effective even with individuals who have a lower IQ. (Camilleri & Quinsey, 2011)

Completing the VRAG

The first step to completing the VRAG is to complete the Childhood & Adolescent Taxon Scale. Below, where a request for information relates to an “index offense” that is the one that led to the individual entering the Criminal Justice system

Childhood & Adolescent Taxon Scale (CATS) Worksheet

This scale includes 8 items that are scored from 0 to 1, based on the coding guidelines provided. These items are:

  1. Elementary School Maladjustment
  2. Teenage Alcohol Problem
  3. Childhood Aggression Rating
  4. More Than 3 DSM Conduct Disorder Symptoms
  5. Ever suspended or expelled from school
  6. Arrested under the age of 16
  7. Lived with both biological parents to age 16 (except for death of parents)

Conduct Disorder Symptoms

Next, the assessor will complete the list of Conduct Disorder symptoms, circling those that occurred before age 16 except for items 13 and 15 which are before aged 16:

  • 1. Often bullied, threatened or intimidated others
  • 2. Often initiated physical fights
  • 3. Used a weapon that could cause serious physical harm to others (e.g., a bat, brick, broken bottle, knife, gun)
  • 4. Was physically cruel to people
  • 5. Was physically cruel to animals
  • 6. Stolen while confronting a victim (e.g., mugging, purse snatching, extortion, robbery)
  • 7. Forced someone into sexual activity
  • 8. Deliberately engaged in fire setting with the intention of causing serious damage
  • 9. Deliberately destroyed others’ property (other than by fire setting)
  • 10. Broken into someone else’s house, car, or building
  • 11. Often lied to obtain goods or favors or to avoid obligations (i.e., “cons” others)
  • 12. Stolen items of nontrivial value without confronting a victim (like shoplifting, theft, or forgery)
  • 13. Before [age] 13, stayed out late at night, despite parental prohibitions
  • 14. Ran away from home overnight (or longer) at least twice while living in parental or parental surrogate home (or once without returning for a lengthy period)
  • 15. Before [age] 13, was often truant from school

Cormier-Lang Criminal History Scores for Non-Violent Offenses

This scoring form allows you to answer item number 5 below, the Criminal History Score for Non-Violent Offenses Prior to the Index Offense. This score is developed by counting the number of non-violent offenses and applying a weight to them. For instance, bank robbery is counted x7 while Indecent Exposure is counted x2. So an individual who has two instances of Indecent Exposure and 1 instance of Bank Robbery would have (2×2 = 4) + (1×7 = 7) = 4+7 = 11.

Violence Risk Appraisal Guide (VRAG) Items

Next are the 12 VRAG items. The tool provides detailed coding instructions for each of these:

  1. Lived with both biological parents to age 16 (except for death of parent):
  2. Elementary School Maladjustment:
  3. History of alcohol problems
  4. Marital status (at the time of or prior to index offense):
  5. Criminal history score for nonviolent offenses prior to the index offense
  6. Failure on prior conditional release (includes parole or probation violation or revocation, failure to comply, bail violation, and any new arrest while on conditional release):
  7. Age at index offense
  8. Victim Injury (for index offense; the most serious is scored):
  9. Any female victim (for index offense)
  10. Meets DSM criteria for any personality disorder (must be made by appropriately licensed or certified professional)
  11. Meets DSM criteria for schizophrenia (must be made by appropriately licensed or certified professional)
  12. a. Psychopathy Checklist score (if available, otherwise use item 12.b. CATS score)
  13. (Technically 12b) bCATS score (from the CATS worksheet)

Scoring the VRAG

Determining Risk

Risk categories are provided in the VRAG manual. They are approximated here although more detail is available in the complete manual. For each score, if an individual is close to the next score you should list them as a combination of the two. For instance an individual whose score is -10, -9 or -8 would be listed as Low-Medium rather than just Low.

  • -24 to -8 is Low Risk
  • -7 to +13 is Medium Risk
  • +14 to +32 is High Risk

Determining Rate of Recidivism

The risk of recidivism is presented below, from the same manual (pages 283-286):

Probability of Recidivism
VRAG score 7 years 10 years
< −22 0.00 0.08
−21 to −15 0.08 0.10
−14 to −8 0.12 0.24
−7 to −1 0.17 0.31
0 to +6 0.35 0.48
+7 to +13 0.44 0.58
+14 to +20 0.55 0.64
+21 to +27 0.76 0.82
> +28 1.00 1.00

This is to be interpreted as a percentage. For instance a score of -10 is in the -14 to -8 category; therefore an individual would have a 7 year recidivism rate of 12% and a 10 year recidivism rate of 24%.

References

American Psychological Association. (2006) Quinsey, V.L., Harris, G.T., Rice, M.E. & Cormier, C.A. (2006) 2nd Ed. Violent Offenders: Appraising and Managing Risk. Washington D.C: American Psychological Association.

Brown, J. & Singh, J.P. (2014) Forensic Risk Assessment: A Beginner’s Guide. Archives of Forensic Psychology. 1(1). 49-59. Retrieved on January 20, 2017 from http://www.archivesofforensicpsychology.com/web/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Brown-and-Singh1.pdf

Camilleri, J.A. & Quinsey, V.L. (2011) Appraising the risk of sexual and violent recidivism among intellectually disabled offenders. Psychology, Crime & Law. 17(1) 59-74

Cite this article as: MacDonald, D.K., (2017), "Using the Violence Risk Appraisal Guide (VRAG)," retrieved on November 17, 2017 from http://dustinkmacdonald.com/using-violence-risk-appraisal-guide-vrag/.
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Level of Care Utilization System (LOCUS)

Introduction

The Level of Care Utilization System or LOCUS tool has been designed by the American Association of Community Psychiatrists (2009) to allow staff who work on inpatient hospital environments with patients with psychiatric problems (such as emergency departments, psychiatric sections of general hospitals or in psychiatric hospitals) to determine the level of care that an individual should receive.

The LOCUS provides for six levels, ranging from the least intense (recovery maintenance, such as seeing a case manager once a month and having access to a 24-hour crisis line if needed) to the most intense (medically managed residential services such as being a hospital inpatient.)

Parameters

The LOCUS is based on a set of parameters that an individual is scored along. The level of care is determined based on the mix of parameters that each client has. These parameters are:

  1. Risk of Harm
  2. Functional Status
  3. Medical, Addictive and Psychiatric Co-morbidity
  4. Recovery Environment
  5. Treatment and Recovery History
  6. Engagement and Recovery Status

In most of these domains there are a number of states that are used to code the domain. For instance, “Risk of Harm” has five potential states from Minimal Risk of Harm to Extreme Risk of Harm. The exception is 4. Recovery Environment which has two subcomponents, Level of Stress and Level of Support.

The LOCUS manual provides detailed coding instructions to allow an individual to be assessed in a reliable, repeatable way.

Levels of Care

For each Level of Care, the manual provides for four categories, Care Environment, Clinical Services, Supportive Systems, and Crisis Stabilization and Prevention Services.

Care Environment describes where services are delivered and what facilities might need to be available. Clinical Services describes the type and number of clinical employees (nurses, etc.) and the types of therapies or treatments available. Supportive Services includes client access to things like case management, outreach and financial support, while Prevention Services include mobile crisis, crisis lines, and other access to services.

Scoring

Each of the levels includes specific individual scores required for a level, and also a composite score. The Composite Score overrides the individual scores to determine which level an individual is placed at if the Composite Score results in a more intense level of care.

Composite Scores

  • Level 1 – 10-13
  • Level 2 – 14-16
  • Level 3 – 17-19
  • Level 4 – 20-22
  • Level 5 – 23 – 27
  • Level 6 – 28+

Level 1 – Recovery Maintenance and Health Management

  • Risk of Harm: 2 or less
  • Functional Status: 2 or less
  • Co-morbidity: 2 or less
  • Level of Stress: Sum of Stress and Support less than 4
  • Level of Support: Sum of Stress and Support less than 4
  • Treatment & Recovery History: 2 or less
  • Engagement & Recovery Status: 2 or less

Level 2 – Low Intensity Community Based Services

  • Risk of Harm: 2 or less
  • Functional Status: 2 or less
  • Co-morbidity: 2 or less
  • Level of Stress: Sum of Stress and Support less than 5
  • Level of Support: Sum of Stress and Support less than 5
  • Treatment & Recovery History: 2 or less
  • Engagement & Recovery Status: 2 or less

Level 3 – High Intensity Community Based Services

  • Risk of Harm: 3 or less
  • Functional Status: 3 or less
  • Co-morbidity: 3 or less
  • Level of Stress: Sum of Stress and Support less than 5
  • Level of Support: Sum of Stress and Support less than 5
  • Treatment & Recovery History: 3 or less
  • Engagement & Recovery Status: 3 or less

Level 4 – Medically Monitored Non-Residential Services

  • Risk of Harm: 3 or less
  • Functional Status: 3 or less
  • Co-morbidity: 3 or less
  • Level of Stress: 3 or 4
  • Level of Support: 3 or less
  • Treatment & Recovery History: 3 or 4
  • Engagement & Recovery Status: 3 or 4

Level 5 – Medically Monitored Residential Services

  • Risk of Harm: If the score is 4 or higher – the client is automatically Level 5
  • Functional Status: If the score is 4 or higher – most clients are automatically Level 5
  • Co-morbidity: If the score is 4 or higher – most clients are automatically Level 5
  • Level of Stress: 4 or more in combination with a rating of 3 or higher on Risk of Harm, Functional Status or Co-morbidity
  • Level of Support: 4 or more in combination with a rating of 3 or higher on Risk of Harm, Functional Status or Co-morbidity
  • Treatment & Recovery History: 3 or more in combination with a rating of 3 or higher on Risk of Harm, Functional Status or Co-morbidity
  • Engagement & Recovery Status: 3 or more in combination with a rating of 3 or higher on Risk of Harm, Functional Status or Co-morbidity

Level 6 – Medically Managed Residential Services

  • Risk of Harm: If the score is 5 or higher – the client is automatically Level 6
  • Functional Status: If the score is 5 or higher – the client is automatically Level 6
  • Co-morbidity: If the score is 5 or higher the client is automatically Level 6
  • Level of Stress: 4 or more
  • Level of Support: 4 or more
  • Treatment & Recovery History: 4 or more
  • Engagement & Recovery Status: 4 or more

Given that there are a number of nuances in the exact scoring it’s recommended that an individual read or receive structured training in administration of the LOCUS. The LOCUS manual also provides a decision tree (not shown) to assist in making your determinations and a determination grid (shown below.)

Level of Care Determination Grid

LOCUS Level of Care Determination Grid

Research

Although the LOCUS is widely used, research is surprisingly limited.

The initial study validating the LOCUS was Sowers, George & Thomson (1999). Their study examined scores on the LOCUS and correlated them to expert decisions to see if the LOCUS matched that decision-making; their results indicated that it performed well in this function.

Kimura, Yagi & Toshizumi (2013) reviewed the LOCUS by comparing scores on it to the Global Assessment Scale (GAS) scores, a similar tool and examining the change of scores from admission to discharge. They found it a sensitive and effective tool for clinical use in Japan.

Ontario Shores, a large mental hospital in Whitby, ON implements the LOCUS along with the RAI tools as well.

References

American Association of Community Psychiatrists. (2009) LOCUS Level of Care Utilization System for Psychiatric and Addictions Services, Adult Version 2010. Retrieved on January 18, 2017 from http://cchealth.org/mentalhealth/pdf/LOCUS.pdf

Kimura, T., Yagi, F., & Yoshizumi, A. (2013). Application of Level of Care Utilization System for Psychiatric and Addiction Services (LOCUS) to Psychiatric Practice in Japan: A Preliminary Assessment of Validity and Sensitivity to Change. Community Mental Health Journal, 49(4), 477-491. doi:10.1007/s10597-012-9562-6

Sowers, W., George, C., & Thomson, K. R. (1999). Level of care utilization system for psychiatric and addiction services (LOCUS): a preliminary assessment of reliability and validity. Community Mental Health Journal, (6), 545.

Cite this article as: MacDonald, D.K., (2017), "Level of Care Utilization System (LOCUS)," retrieved on November 17, 2017 from http://dustinkmacdonald.com/level-care-utilization-system-locus/.
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Manage Stress Like a Marine

Military members salute

Introduction

Nobody knows stress management like the US military. Stress management has been recognized as an important part of ensuring an effective fighting force since the First World War. The US Marine Coprs manual MCRP 6-11C, “Combat and Operational Stress Control” (2010) is one part of this program.

Bite-sized takeaway: Know yourself and your team (whether that’s fellow Marines in a military environment or family and coworkers in a civilian enivronment) and be alert for any sudden, persistent or progressive change in their behaviour

Combat Stress Reactions

A combat stress-reaction (CSR) is the military equivalent to acute stress reaction, the state of agitation seen as a response to combat or other stressful or traumatic situations. These symptoms, if not properly managed, can lead to Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD.)

The most common combat stress reaction symptoms include:

  • Slow reaction time
  • Difficulty with tasks and prioritizing
  • Excessive concern with minor issues
  • Indecision
  • Focus on familiar tasks
  • Loss of initiative

It can be hard to recognize when something is a normal reaction to battle or something that requires more intense medical or psychological support. One example given is that mild shaking while being fired upon or mortar rounds are incoming is very normal. On the other hand, intense shaking post-battle can be incapacitating and will require additional support.

Normal reactions to battle can include:

  • Perspiration
  • Chills
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Loss of appetite
  • Abdominal distress
  • Frequent urination
  • Incontinence

Dreams and flashbacks are one area that are commonly associated with PTSD. MCRP 6-11C notes that vivid battle dreams are a totally normal part of working through and processing combat experiences. Additionally, flashbacks are normal as long as they are recognized as flashbacks. These may become part of PTSD if the acute stress reaction is not managed but can be treated.

Some issues that may require more intensive support are stress-related blindness/deafness or partial paralysis. These can improve with reassurance from comrades, unit medical personnel or the batallion physician. As well, a reaction known as a panic run, where the service member rushes about without self-control or awareness (US Army, 1950) also requires evacuation for treatment.

Managing Combat Stress Reactions

If you need to, remove a soldier’s access to his weapon if he is experiencing combat stress reactions and you’re not sure he can keep himself safe. Additionally, give him simple tasks to do when not sleeping, eating, or resting. Strategies to manage combat stress reaction include:

  • Treating the service member close to the front (better outcomes happen when the service member is out of danger but still in theatre)
  • Utilize the BICEPS Model of Combat Stress Control
    • Brief (they should be out of the field no more than 3-4 days)
    • Immediate (treatment should be identified and started quickly)
    • Centrality (they should be treated out of hospital but close to the front)
    • Expectancy (the chain of command should have faith the service member will recover)
    • Proximity (keep the service member close to the rest of their unit so they can offer support)
    • Simplicity (the treatment should focus on the member’s return to duty)

Sleep Deprivation

Night time is the time to retain or gain the initiative, so it is common for operations to occur then. This increases the chance that sleep deprivation affects military member abilities to manage combat stress. Increasing circulation through activities like moderate exercise or drinking hot beverages may shorten start-up time after a short time sleeping.

After 36-48 hours of complete sleep loss, a minimum of 12 hours of sleep will be required to regain functioning. Keep watch for sleep drunkenness, which is the opposite (reduced functioning as a result of sleeping too much.)

Grief and Death

One area that many military members struggle with is grief and death. So-called open grieving, talking about grief and loss with comrades can help alleviate anxiety, whether this is a fear of the military member’s own death or survivor guilt from having lost friends and fellow military members on the battlefield.

Stress Management Techniques

It’s recommended that each service member know two stress management techniques: a slow or long one that can be used for deep relaxation and a quick one that can be deployed on-the-job.

Psychological Stress Management

Confidence is one of the strongest defences against stress. “If men can’t fight back, fear will overtake; as long as they can return fire they will not fear.”

Cognitive exercises include positive self-talk, visualization, rehearsal and meditation. Positive self-talk involves telling yourself that things will work out for you, rather than assuming and thinking the worst. Replacing bad self-talk with good self-talk can help increase your resilience.

Visualization is a cognitive technique that involves imagining good things. When you remember something that made you angry, your body reacts the same (your blood pressure rises and constricts), and you’re “right back there” mentally. By visualizing happy things, your blood pressure reduces and you find yourself more able to cope.

Rehearsal is similar to visualization but specifically involves yourself going over the tasks in your mind that you are about to perform. This helps to give you more confidence that you’re able to perform these tasks. Finally, meditation is a form of deep breathing and relaxation to improve one’s emotional state.

Physical Stress Management

Good nutrition and hydration is important. Remember the acronym HALT, the four items that make regulating our emotions more difficult (HALT is “Hungry, Angry, Lonely, Tired.”) If the service member only drinks when they are thirsty, they’ll become dehydrated.

Increasing your aerobic fitness increases your ability to handle stress

Mastering relaxation techniques allows you to reverse the combat stress process. Physical stress management techniques include deep breathing, and progressive muscle relaxation.

Breathing Techniques

Deep Breathing involves slow, deep inhaling. Deep breathe for 2-5 seconds, then exhale slowly over 2-5 seconds
Perform this exercise 5 times for a quick mind-clearing, or continuously at night to promote sleep. Diaphragmatic breathing (which is deep in the chest, as opposed to shallow) is especially helpful for stress control

Muscle Relaxation is a special form of relaxation where you concentrate on one muscle group at a time, tensing and relaxing your limbs in order to relax your entire body. The quick version involves tensing all your muscles simultaneously, holding this state for 15 seconds, letting your body relax, and shaking out all the tension.

The long version involves starting in your feet and working up, body part by body part until you reach your head, tensing and then relaxing the limbs.

Pre and Post-Deployment Reactions

New members to a unit are more likely to become casualties than experienced members. Keeping this in mind, experienced members can help mentor new ones to build resilience and support. “Startle reactions to sudden noise
or movement, combat dreams and nightmares and occasional problems with sleeping, and feeling bored, frustrated and out of place” wee all identified as being common after deployment, as the service member re-integrates into their community.

References

US Army. (1950) TM 8-240 Psychiatry in Military Law. Washington, DC: Department of the Army and the Air Force.

US Marine Corps. (2010) MCRP 6-11C, “Combat and Operational Stress Control”. Retrieved on September 5, 2016 from http://www.marines.mil/Portals/59/Publications/MCRP%206-11C%20%20Combat%20and%20Operational%20Stress%20Control.pdf

Cite this article as: MacDonald, D.K., (2017), "Manage Stress Like a Marine," retrieved on November 17, 2017 from http://dustinkmacdonald.com/manage-stress-like-marine/.
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PREPaRE Model for School Crisis Intervention

Introduction

When we normally think of crisis intervention, we think of adults responding to events in their personal life. Of course, people young and old can require crisis intervention, and not just from events in their personal life. School violence, natural disasters and other elements can require crisis intervention.

Werner (2015) noted that the tow most important activities school counsellors can do to prepare for crisis events are to develop a comprehensive crisis plan and to practice it regularly. The goal of the PREPaRE Curriculum is to train mental health worker, school psychologists and other administrators, educators and clinicians to develop such a crisis plan, to build a crisis team to execute that plan and to understand the tasks of crisis intervention in the aftermath of a crisis.

School Crisis Intervention

Most school counsellors receive little or no crisis intervention training and therefore enter the field feeling unprepared to handle tasks that become assigned to them in the aftermath of a crisis. (Allen, et. al., 2002) Training like the PREPaRE Model and other programs can help bridge this gap.

Knox & Roberts (2005) performed a comprehensive literature review on school crisis intervention and specifically crisis intervention teams. They found that there was a need for well-thought out crisis intervention programs and plans before crises occur, and that there were similarities in the literature about how experts believed response to a crisis should be structured.

They recommended school crisis intervention be split into three phases:

Primary Interventions

Primary prevention activities are those that are provided to all students in order to promote safety and health. These could be “conflict resolution, gun safety and safe driving courses, alcohol and drug awareness programs, teenage parenting resources, and suicide prevention programs.” (Knox & Roberts, 2005; p.94)

Secondary Interventions

Secondary prevention activities focus on individuals in the aftermath of a crisis in order to limit its impact. This can include physical measures like moving students, debriefing and immediate crisis intervention in the aftermath, and notifying parents and the media.

Tertiary Interventions

Tertiary interventions include long-term counselling and psychotherapy that extends after the crisis period ends and the school environment returns to normal.

PREPaRE Framework

  • Prevent and Prepare for psychological trauma
  • Reaffirm physical health, perceptions of security and safety
  • Evaluate psychological trauma risk
  • Provide interventions and Respond to psychological needs
  • Examine the effectiveness of crisis prevention and intervention

The PREPare Model is structured around two workshops. The first (1-day) workshop is provided for all school staff to teach them how the crisis team and crisis intervention works, while the second (2-day) workshop is designed specifically for crisis team members.

PREPaRE Curriculum

The following information comes from Nickerson et. al. (2014):

Crisis Prevention and Preparedness (1-day workshop for all staff)

  • Identify four characteristics of a crisis event.
  • Identify the key concepts associated with the PREPaRE acronym.
  • Describe the four activities of the school crisis team.
  • Understand the importance of hierarchical crisis team structure and response.
  • Identify the five major functions of the Incident Command System (ICS).
  • Identify strategies for communicating with school boards creating or sustaining teams.
  • Identify three concepts related to crime prevention through environmental design.
  • Identify guiding principles in crisis plan development.
  • Identify essential components of crisis plans.
  • Identify key concepts from the workshop that their crisis team needs to learn or address to be adequately prepared for crisis situations

Crisis Intervention and Recovery (2-day workshop for crisis intervention staff)

  • Report improved attitudes toward, and readiness to provide, school crisis intervention.
  • Identify the variables that determine the traumatizing potential of a crisis event.
  • Identify the range of school crisis interventions indicated by the PREPaRE acronym.
  • Indicate how school crisis interventions fit into the larger school crisis response.
  • Specify the critical factors in evaluating psychological trauma risk after a crisis event.
  • Match psychological trauma risk to a range of appropriate school crisis interventions.

Elements of a Crisis Team

A crisis team should be in place before a crisis occurs so that they can immediately get to work after a crisis occurs. Knox & Roberts (2005) recommend that the team be comprised of 4-8 multidisciplinary members (e.g. Principal, counsellor, nurse, etc.)

Responding to a Crisis

Brock (2006) indicates a variety of responses for each level of the framework that are available to the mental health professional facilitating a crisis intervention. These items assume that a crisis has already occurred.

Reaffirm physical health, perceptions of security and safety

  • Meet physical needs like shelter and water
  • Provide a sense of safety by removing individuals from the site of a crisis
  • Remove or restrict access to dangerous objects or crisis site (remove sharps, put up barriers, etc.)

Evaluate psychological trauma risk

  • Evaluate exposure to crisis and note reactions (physical, behavioural, cognitive)
  • Examine internal and external resources (within the school and local community agencies)
  • Refer clients to psychotherapy where possible

Provide interventions and Respond to psychological needs

  • Re-establish social support systems. This can involve
  • Provide psycho-education: Empower survivors and their caregivers
  • Provide immediate crisis intervention
  • Provide/Refer for longer term crisis intervention

Evaluation of the PREPaRE Curriculum

Brock et. al. (2011) performed the initial evaluation of the program and found that participants significantly improved on their skills related to crisis prevention, crisis intervention and displayed high general satisfaction with the workshops. When Nickerson et. al. (2014) evaluated the PREPaRE after making changes they found that these benefits continued to be demonstrated in follow-ups, proving the efficacy of the program.

Training in the PREPaRE Model

Brock (2006) publishes the content of the PREPaRE workshop online, where they can be accessed in order to help individuals build their crisis intervention skills. Additionally, workshops can be accessed through the National Association for School Psychologists (NASP).

References

Allen, M., Burt, K., Bryan, E., Carter, D., Orsi, R, & Durkan, L.(2002). School counselors’ preparation for and participation in crisis intervention. Professional School Counseling, 6, 96-102

Brock, S.E. (2006) “Crisis Intervention Training”, Workshop PDF. Accessed on November 19, 2016 from www.csus.edu/indiv/b/brocks/workshops/district/smfcsd.12.06.pdf

Brock, S. E., Nickerson, A. B., Reeves, M. A., Savage, T. A., & Woitaszewski, S. A. (2011). Development, Evaluation, and Future Directions of the PREPaRE School Crisis Prevention and Intervention Training Curriculum. Journal Of School Violence10(1), 34-52. doi:10.1080/15388220.2010.519268

Knox, K., & Roberts, A. (2005). Crisis intervention and crisis team models in schools. Children & Schools27(2), 93-100.

Nickerson, A. B., Serwacki, M. L., Brock, S. E., Savage, T. A., Woitaszewski, S. A., & Louvar Reeves, M. A. (2014). PROGRAM EVALUATION OF THE PREPaRE SCHOOL CRISIS PREVENTION AND INTERVENTION TRAINING CURRICULUM. Psychology In The Schools51(5), 466-479. doi:10.1002/pits.21757

Cite this article as: MacDonald, D.K., (2016), "PREPaRE Model for School Crisis Intervention," retrieved on November 17, 2017 from http://dustinkmacdonald.com/prepare-model-school-crisis-intervention/.
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